The Return Of Jamaican Bobsledding

In its first Winter Olympics since 2002, the Jamaican bobsled team finished 29th out of 30 in the two-man event. (USA TODAY Sports)

In its first Winter Olympics since 2002, the Jamaican bobsled team finished 29th out of 30 in the two-man event. (USA TODAY Sports)

Over the weekend, Sports on Earth posted its second documentary, Breaking the Ice, revealing the true story of the Jamaican bobsled team that initially gained fame by competing at the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary. The Jamaican team proceeded to compete in the 1992, 1994, 1998 and 2002 Games, with the movie Cool Runnings providing the Disneyfied version of the story in ’93.

After a 12-year absence, the Jamaican team finally got back to the Olympics in Sochi, competing in the two-man bobsled event that concluded on Monday.

Unfortunately, the Jamaicans finished in 29th place, last among the teams that completed the first three heats, although ultimately they did finish ahead of Serbia. The United States team of Steven Holcomb and Steven Langton took home the bronze medal, finishing behind Russia and Switzerland. The result was about normal for the Jamaican team, as they finished 28th in 2002, although they did produce a 14th-place finisher in the 1994 four-man bobsled.

Ultimately, of course, nobody is expecting a medal-winning team from Jamaica, and simply competing in the Winter Olympics remains quite an achievement. Watch the full story of the first Jamaican bobsled team in 1988 that made it possible here:

One thought on “The Return Of Jamaican Bobsledding

  1. I remember when I first heard that there would be a Jamaican Bobsled team competing in the Winter Olympics. I didn’t believe it. Kudos to them for trying something majorly different. Also applaud them for keeping at it.

    I didn’t expect them to be last at Sochi, though. I’m sure they will be back. That’s basically what the Olympics is about. Athletes keep coming back, and trying. Perseverance and adventure is in their blood. They may just surprise us at the next Winter Olympics.